The Price of the Wearable Craze: Less Data Security

Technology pioneer isn't a role people associate with former Vice President, Dick Cheney, but technology security experts today give his medical advisory team props for a move made back in 2007 - disabling the wireless capability on Cheney's pacemaker. The act was, of course, a cautionary effort against any entity that might have tried to hack it to cause Cheney harm. In rare instances, weak links in a cloud-based network powering something like a wearable insulin pump could be life threatening. On the privacy side, personal data culled from all types of devices are finding their way to employers, insurance companies and the black market, resulting in a range of grievances, from higher insurance premiums to identity theft.

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Health Researchers Aim to Leverage iPhones’ Biometrics, Ubiquity

Researchers at the USC Center for Body Computing have developed a new mobile app that will allow users to embed biometric heart rate data into their shared photos. Called Biogram, the app is intended to help the researchers to study how the public sharing of biometric data could affect social relationships, in addition to helping researchers to collect additional biometric data collected by the users' mobile devices.

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Promise Doesn't Equal Proof

I've just returned from California, where I attended these 3 conferences: Transforming Medicine - Evidence driven mHealth, Health 2.0 Fall Conference and the 9th Annual USC Body Computing Conference. For this post, I'm going to focus on what I observed at these events regarding the quest for evidence in Digital Health. I'll be writing separate blog posts in the future relating to my overall experience at each of these events.

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VSP's Global Innovation Lab Inks Wearable Tech Research Partnership with USC

VSP's innovation lab, The Shop is teaming up with the USC Center for Body Computing to take PROJECT GENESIS---the first wearable tech prototype to seamlessly integrate health-tracking sensors into an optical frame---into an exciting new phase of development. Our team of innovators will work together with the CBC on connecting our wearable technology to the new frontier of mobile and contextualized health.

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Calling all coders: USC Center for Body Computing hosts ‘Hacking Virtual Medicine’ 2-day hackathon with ICT and IEEE Standards Association

As an academic leader in the digital health revolution, the University of Southern California (USC) Center for Body Computing (CBC), part of the Keck School of Medicine of USC, announced today its first hackathon."Hacking Virtual Medicine," using Virtual Reality (VR) tools to create a consumer experience evolution in health and medicine. Software and hardware programmers, developers, and designers will join innovative engineers, clinicians, business people, and others for a 2-day marathon brainstorming and building event October 3-4.

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Moneyball 2.0: Keeping players healthy

In the locker rooms across the country, amid the pads, balls and helmets, sports teams are increasingly relying on a new piece of equipment. It's typically about the size of a thin flip phone and is worn in the middle of an athlete's back, usually under a compression shirt. When the biometric sensor starts whirring to life, every athletic movement, every heartbeat and every muscle twitch is converted into numbers, arming teams with more information than ever about an athlete's performance, potential and health.

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SXSW 2015: Dr. Leslie Saxon On The Implantable Future

You'd be hard-pressed to find a consumer tech company that isn't selling a wearable device, or at least thinking about it. Whether for health or fitness, plenty of people are strapping on sensors to gather data. At South by Southwest this year, Dr. Leslie Saxon, an interventional cardiologist and director of the Center for Body Computing at the University of Southern California spoke about the future of where that biometric data will take us for an IEEE panel. Her vision for it goes beyond a watch or wristband.

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Heart monitor app adds health element to social media

Dental student Katie Schwarts has an irregular heartbeat. She used to get regular electrocardiograms. Now she uses her phone to record one and emails it to her doctor. If it feels out of sync, a free app along with a miniature AliveCor monitor lets her check the status of her heart. Now the creators of the app have teamed up with USC cardiologist Leslie Saxon and her colleagues to create the first mobile app that allows users to stamp their heart rate onto a photo that can be shared online.

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